INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIA

PHOTOGRAPHY & WORDS BY PORTIA LARGE 

Traditional hunting methods are still alive among indigenous Australians. To this day the women of Kakadu hunt and forage for food locally. On my journey, I made friends with a young girl at Warradjan Aboriginal Culture Centre – she had never explored beyond Kakadu and was fascinated with city living. When I asked of her favourite foods, she said she loves snake eggs for breakfast and that they were much better than chicken eggs!

“Wanna snake egg – easy!” she exclaimed. “You gotta find a snake hole”. I asked what to do once I found one, to which she replied: “Put your hand down there and grab it”. Simple as that – bush delicacies are for the brave. I wouldn’t risk it – not for the best scrambled eggs of my life! In this part of the NT, locals enjoy buffalo, crocodile, turtle and snake meat.

P1070526

P1090134


After learning the local hunter-gatherer lifestyle, I wanted to test my skills at Top Diji spear throwing. After several attempts to improve my technique, it was apparent I did not excel in javelin class and wouldn’t last long in the wild with only a spear – hello hangry!

P1080612

Perhaps I’d shine in a more creative outlet – dot painting. Thinking of myself as a bit of a free spirit, I chose to paint one – Mimi Spirits are fairy-like beings of Indigenous tribes. With extremely thin, elongated bodies these spirits are said to have taught Australian Aborigines to hunt, use fire and dance.

P1080632

P1080656

DESERT PARK ALICE SPRINGS

With the help of a head torch, we spotted echidnas and bilbies within minutes at the @desertparkalicesprings Nocturnal Tour. The next day we returned to check out the birds of prey show. With a wingspan of almost 3m, I found the desert eagle most impressive. Aside from getting to know all of the awesome Aussie animals, you can sample indigneous bush tucker like passion fruit, beans and tomato raisins. Investment: $32.00 p.p

P10709181

P1070971

You may also like